Jesus also, that he might sanctify the people with his own blood, suffered outside the gate.  Therefore, let us go forth to him outside the camp, bearing his reproach.  For we have no continuing city here, but we seek one to come.

 
 
 

Going to Jesus

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Thought for the Evening
9-12

THE DESOLATE WOMAN AND THE WIFE

"Sing, O barren, that did not bear! Break forth into singing!
And cry aloud, you who did not travail with child! For more are the children
of the desolate than the children of the married wife, saith the LORD."

Isaiah 54:1

There were many subtle passages in the prophets that foretold of God's turning from the Jews and reaching out to Gentiles. The one above is one of those passages, and it is remarkable for what it promises to us Gentiles who believe. In it, God is saying that more Gentiles will be His than those who first were chosen. The "desolate woman" in Isaiah's prophecy is the Gentiles, who concerning the things of God were completely "desolate" in Isaiah's time. And then, "she who has a husband" refers to Old Testament Israel, to whom God was joined in a covenant of marriage at Mt. Sinai after He had delivered them from bondage in Egypt.

God was proclaiming through Isaiah that at some point in the future, He would turn to the Gentiles and that more of them would surrender to His love than would the Jews, whom God first chose to be His. It was good for Isaiah that the Israelites did not understand Isaiah's prophecy. When Jesus suggested in the synagogue at Nazareth that God had loved some Gentiles more than He had loved some Jews, the Jews who heard his comment attacked him, threw him out of the city, and would have killed him if God had not made a way for him to escape (Lk. 4:16-30).

In John's Revelation, he saw a blessed multitude of redeemed people so large that no man could number it. They stood before the Lord with great joy. He wrote: "After these things I looked, and there, standing before the throne and before the Lamb, clothed in long white robes and palm branches in their hands, was a vast multitude taken from all nations and tribes and peoples and languages that no one was able to number!" (Rev. 7:9). What John was seeing was the fulfillment of God's promise to the Gentiles that He had long ago spoken through Isaiah, that there would be more of us Gentiles who would be saved in the end than there would be Jews.

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